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  • Manny Pacquiao knows how to put up a good fight

    Written by Jay on Nov 12, 2011

    Manny Pacquiao, the fiery Filipino boxing icon, is up Saturday night against nemesis Juan Manual Marquez of Mexico.
     
    The last two fights were close - ending in a draw and a one-point rematch - which has led Marquez's camp to claim a technical victory. Of course, that hasn't sat well with Pacquiao, who's been training like mad for a knockout throwdown in Las Vegas this weekend.
     
    Pacquiao was deemed "The Godfather" in some international covers of Newsweek. You can read the story here. This kind of media coverage of a boxer - who also took the front page of TIME - shows he knows how to whip a frenzy. 
     
    An excerpt:
     
    • To call Manny Pacquiao a “boxer” is one of those descriptions that don’t quite fly, like calling Mahatma Gandhi a “Hindu lawyer.” The pound-for-pound greatest fighter on earth has begun to move beyond his bloody sport in increasingly unpredictable ways. In the Philippines, where he was born into abject poverty, the WBO welterweight champion is an almost religious figure, whose following is ecstatically cult-like. In America, he is “Pacman”—the idol of Las Vegas mega-fights, the Bruce Lee of Marquess of Queensberry boxing: tiny, furious, and lethal. “Manny Pacquiao,” Mike Tyson has said, “is a phenomenon.”
     
    We admire Pacquiao, however, not just for his tremendous athletic prowess, but his multifaceted career. The man has finger in every pie, from politics to music to acting.
     
    Now that is what we call a Renaissance man. 
     
    Read more...
Manny Pacquiao knows how to put up a good fight

Manny Pacquiao, the fiery Filipino boxing icon, is up Saturday night against nemesis Juan Manual Marquez of Mexico.
 
The last two fights were close - ending in a draw and a one-point rematch - which has led Marquez's camp to claim a technical victory. Of course, that hasn't sat well with Pacquiao, who's been training like mad for a knockout throwdown in Las Vegas this weekend.
 
Pacquiao was deemed "The Godfather" in some international covers of Newsweek. You can read the story here. This kind of media coverage of a boxer - who also took the front page of TIME - shows he knows how to whip a frenzy. 
 
An excerpt:
 
  • To call Manny Pacquiao a “boxer” is one of those descriptions that don’t quite fly, like calling Mahatma Gandhi a “Hindu lawyer.” The pound-for-pound greatest fighter on earth has begun to move beyond his bloody sport in increasingly unpredictable ways. In the Philippines, where he was born into abject poverty, the WBO welterweight champion is an almost religious figure, whose following is ecstatically cult-like. In America, he is “Pacman”—the idol of Las Vegas mega-fights, the Bruce Lee of Marquess of Queensberry boxing: tiny, furious, and lethal. “Manny Pacquiao,” Mike Tyson has said, “is a phenomenon.”
 
We admire Pacquiao, however, not just for his tremendous athletic prowess, but his multifaceted career. The man has finger in every pie, from politics to music to acting.
 
Now that is what we call a Renaissance man.